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Very shallow M6.6 earthquake hits Ogasawara region, Japan
A very shallow earthquake registered by the JMA as M6.6 hit Japanese Ogasawara Archipelago at 18:22 UTC (03:22 JST) on August 16, 2018. The USGS is reporting M6.4 at a depth of 11.5 km (7.1 miles) at 18:21 and M6.0 at 18:22 UTC. EMSC is reporting M6.4 and M5.9 at a depth of 10 km (6.2 miles). According to the USGS, the epicenter was located 251 km (156 miles) SE of Iwo Jima, 420.9 km (261.5 miles) SSW of Ogasawara, Japan and 945.4 km (587.5 miles) NNW of Saipan, Northen Mariana Islands. There are no people living within 100 km (62 miles). Although there may be slight sea-level changes in coastal regions, this earthquake has caused no damage to Japan, JMA said. The closest volcanoes are Minami-Hiyoshi and Nikko, both submarine. They have located roughly 100 km (62 miles) W of the epicenter. Periodic water discoloration and water-spouting have been reported over Minami-Hiyoshi since 1975 when detonations and an explosion were als…

First Blue Moon Total Eclipse In 150 Years Coming On Jan. 31, 2018


The world was treated to a stellar show to start 2018 as the year’s first supermoon appeared on New Year’s Day. Now, sky watchers are preparing for an even rarer event this month: a blue moon total lunar eclipse.
The month’s second full moon on Jan. 31 is known as a blue moon. The event will coincide with a total lunar eclipse, which is called a “blood moon” because of the reddish color people see during the eclipse. The rare combo of lunar events hasn’t been seen in more than 150 years. Astronomers have to go all the way back to March 31, 1866, to find the last “Blue Blood Moon.”

To make the event even more spectacular, the full moon will also be a supermoon like the one on Jan. 1. Shortly before the blue moon starts, Earth’s lone natural satellite will reach a point known as perigee, where it is at its closest point to the planet and appears much larger to the naked eye.
So when and where can the “Super Blue Blood Moon” be seen?
The event will start in the early hours on Jan. 31 and last into the morning of Feb. 1. On America’s East Coast the eclipse will start coming into view at 5:51 a.m. and will give viewers in cities like New York only a small window to see the reddish moon. America’s West Coast will get the best look at the blood moon as the eclipse begins at 2:51 a.m. and will last through 6 a.m.
For people who miss the early morning moon show, they can catch the blue moon portion of the event at night on Jan. 31, which will start at around 9:30 p.m. on the East Coast. Blue moons come around every 2.7 years, but this year may be a once in a lifetime sight.

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