Image
Threat of powerful eruption at Kuchinoerabu volcano prompts evacuations, Japan
The Japan Meteorological Agency raised the alert level for the Kuchinoerabu volcano in Kagoshima Prefecture from 2 to second highest level of 4 at 01:30 UTC (10:30 JST) on Wednesday, August 15, 2018. This volcano is located on the Kuchinoerabu Island in southwestern Japan, some 1 000 km (620 miles) SW of Tokyo. Its last eruption took place in 2015. The decision to raise the alert was made due to 26 volcanic earthquakes detected within just a few hours. The largest was M1.9 at a depth of 5 km (3.1 miles) in almost the same location as a similar pre-eruption quake that struck 3 years ago. JMA warned that eruption could be powerful enough to cause serious damage to the island's residential area. Level 4 alert means that elderly and disabled people should be evacuated and everyone else should prepare to evacuate. This is the first such warning for this volcano since May 2015 when a powerful eruption forced …

Eruption of Fuego volcano forces school closures, Orange Alert issued

Eruption of Fuego volcano forces school closures, Orange Alert issued

Guatemalan authorities issued an Orange Alert for Fuego volcano after its first eruption of the year on February 1, 2018. Explosions at the volcano lasted 20 hours, generating pyroclastic flows and a column of ash up to 6 500 m (21 325 feet) above sea level. Ash drifted up to 40 km (25 miles) to the west and southwest.
CONRED said the eruption affected 47 704 people in the departments of Sacatepéquez, Chimaltenango, Escuintla and Suchitepéquez.
Pyroclastic flows descended through the Honda, Santa Teresa, Las Lajas and Ceniza ravines with lengths between 700 and 1 500 meters (2 300 - 4 900 feet), INSIVUMEH reported.
Ashfall was recorded in the La Rochela and Ceylon communities in Escuintla, Escuintla; in the urban centers of Santa Lucia Cotzumalguapa and Siquinalá, Escuintla; San Pedro Yepocapa, Palo Verde Estate, Sangre de Cristo, Panimaché I and II, Santa Sofía, Morales and Yucales, in Yepocapa, Chimaltenango.
In addition, authorities closed the National Route 14 at kilometer 90 due to the advance of pyroclastic flows. The closure was a preventive measure.
Fuego volcano RSAM January 31 - February 1, 2018
Fuego RSAM January 31 - February 1m 2018. Credit: INSIVUMEH
Eruption of Fuego volcano on February 1, 2018
Eruption of Fuego volcano on February 1, 2018. Credit: Phobos
Due to the increase in activity and the presence of ash, the education authorities of Sacatepéquez and Escuintla suspended all educational activities. 
To provide a better response and coordination in the municipality, San Juan Alotenango, Sacatepéquez, declared Municipal Red Alert and activated the Municipal Emergency Operations Center, which identifies the places that could function as shelters.
The population living in the vicinity of the volcano is urged to comply with instructions issued by authorities and stay away from the ravines or places that could be affected by ballistic materials expelled from the crater.
In addition, precautionary measures must also be taken for ashfall, protecting the containers where water for human consumption is stored, covering eyes and respiratory passages in the presence of fine ash particles and reporting observed incidents at number 119 of the CONRED.

Geological summary

Volcán Fuego, one of Central America's most active volcanoes, is one of three large stratovolcanoes overlooking Guatemala's former capital, Antigua. The scarp of an older edifice, Meseta, lies between 3 763 m (12 345.8 feet) high Fuego and its twin volcano to the north, Acatenango. Construction of Meseta dates back to about 230 000 years and continued until the late Pleistocene or early Holocene. The collapse of Meseta may have produced the massive Escuintla debris-avalanche deposit, which extends about 50 km (31 miles) onto the Pacific coastal plain.
Growth of the modern Fuego volcano followed, continuing the southward migration of volcanism that began at Acatenango. In contrast to the mostly andesitic Acatenango, eruptions at Fuego have become more mafic with time, and most historical activity has produced basaltic rocks. Frequent vigorous historical eruptions have been recorded since the onset of the Spanish era in 1524, and have produced major ashfalls, along with occasional pyroclastic flows and lava flows.
Featured image: Eruption of Fuego volcano on February 1, 2018. Credit: Phobos

Popular posts from this blog