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Very deep M6.7 earthquake under Flores Sea, Indonesia
A very deep earthquake registered by the BMKG as M6.7 hit under the Flores Sea, Indonesia at 15:35 UTC on August 17, 2018. The agency is reporting a depth of 559 km (347 miles). USGS is reporting M6.5 at a depth of 538.7 km (334 miles). EMSC is reporting M6.1 at a depth of 546 km (339 miles). This earthquake can have a low humanitarian impact based on the magnitude and the affected population and their vulnerability. According to the USGS, the epicenter was located 109.3 km (67.9 miles) NNW of Kampungbajo, 120 km (74.5 miles) N of Labuan Bajo (population 188 724), 150.3 km (93.4 miles) NNW of Ruteng (population 34 569) and 167 km (103.8 miles) NE of Bima (population 66 970), Indonesia. The quake had no tsunami potential, BMKG said. There are about 3 000 people living within 100 km (62 miles). Some 26 659 000 people are estimated to have felt weak shaking. The USGS issued a green alert for shaking-related fatalities and economic los…

SPACE WEATHER REPORT FOR FEBRUARY 4th, 2018


LATEST SOLAR NEWS:
(Feb 4 0324UTC) An unexpected uptick in umbral magnetic field activity is visible south of the equator over the eastern limb. In 171 and 304 angstroms, we can tell that large plasma filaments are likely accompanying a real sunspot group as the X-ray flux has already begun to jostle off the baseline. 

Eyes on the limb for the possible entry of a rare sunspot group during the cycle minimum! (Feb 4 0324UTC) An unexpected uptick in umbral magnetic field activity is visible south of the equator over the eastern limb. In 171 and 304 angstroms, we can tell that large plasma filaments are likely accompanying a real sunspot group as the X-ray flux has already begun to jostle off the baseline. 

Eyes on the limb for the possible entry of a rare sunspot group during the cycle minimum!

POLAR CROWN CORONAL HOLE: 
A large hole in the sun's atmosphere has formed around the sun's north pole. This is called a "polar crown coronal hole," and it is spewing solar wind into space. This image, based on data from  NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, shows where the sun's magnetic field has opened up, allowing the gaseous material to escape:



Although this hole is not directly facing Earth, forecasters believe that some of the emerging solar wind could spill down and brush against our planet's magnetic field on Feb. 4th and 5th. Minor geomagnetic storms and Arctic auroras are possible when the solar wind arrives later this weekend.

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