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Mysterious triangle looking like a cloaked craft appears in the sky over Kansas City, Missouri, Miami, Florida and Canada
This huge triangle was observed in the sky over Kansas City, Missouri, then on August 8, 2018, while driving south along the I-35 highway. What could this be? The strange shape in the clouds was observed for 3 minutes by the eyewitness.
As he drove out of the highway to the north, the mysterious shadow (of an unidentified flying object?) also disappeared behind the trees on the horizon.
This video of the strange sky phenomenon was submitted by the witness: Video Player 00:00

Massive Glowing 'Rogue' planet spotted 'drifting' in space

Artist's conception of SIMP J01365663+0933473, an object with 12.7 times the mass of Jupiter, but a magnetic field 200 times more powerful than Jupiter's. This object is 20 light-years from Earth. Credit: Caltech/Chuck Carter; NRAO/AUI/NSF

A massive glowing "rogue" planetary-mass object has been discovered, surprising scientists with not only its size but also the fact it's not orbiting a star.
The object, named SIMP J01365663+0933473, has a magnetic field more than 200 times stronger than Jupiter’s and is nearly 13 times the size of the gas giant. At its size, it's right between the size of a planet and a failed star, so scientists will need to study it further to determine exactly what it is.
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“This object is right at the boundary between a planet and a brown dwarf, or ‘failed star,’ and is giving us some surprises that can potentially help us understand magnetic processes on both stars and planets,” said Caltech graduate student Melodie Kao, who led the study, in a statement.
The study's findings have been published in the Astrophysical Journal.
Kao and her team are surprised that the object isn't orbiting a star, a typical behavior of planets.
“Detecting SIMP J01365663+0933473 with the VLA through its auroral radio emission also means that we may have a new way of detecting exoplanets, including the elusive rogue ones not orbiting a parent star,” Caltech's Gregg Hallinan added in the statement.
Originally discovered in 2016, it was only recently that it was identified as a planetary-mass object, having originally been classified as a brown dwarf. Once more data was obtained, the idea that SIMP J01365663+0933473 was a brown dwarf was scrapped.
It's thought that SIMP J01365663+0933473  is only 200 million-years-old and is just 20 light-years away from Earth. It also has a surface temperature of 1,500 degrees Fahrenheit, compared to minus 234 degrees Fahrenheit for Jupiter and 10,000 degrees Fahrenheit for the Sun.
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It was first detected using a radio telescope, the  National Science Foundation's Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array.
Aside from its glow, seen in the picture, and its other uncharacteristic traits, SIMP J01365663+0933473 may help scientists discover other worlds, known as exoplanets, as well as understand these far-away celestial bodies.
“This particular object is exciting because studying its magnetic dynamo mechanisms can give us new insights on how the same type of mechanisms can operate in extrasolar planets — planets beyond our Solar System," Kao said.
She continued: "We think these mechanisms can work not only in brown dwarfs but also in both gas giant and terrestrial planets.”
SIMP J013656.5 +093347 may be a brown dwarf in the constellation Pisces. It belongs to the spectral class T2.5 and its position shifts due to its proper motion annually by about 1.24 arcsec with a position angle of about 90°.
This brown dwarf provided the first evidence for periodic variability flux variations among T dwarfs. This has been interpreted as a signature of weather patterns coming in and out of view over the object's 2.4h rotation period. The shape of this lightcurve evolves over timescales of days, which has been interpreted as a sign of the evolution of the cloud patterns in its atmosphere.
In 2017, it was announced that the object's mass may be as low as 12.7 Jupiter masses and should be considered a planet rather than a Brown Dwarf as it seems to be a member of the relatively young, 200 million-year-old Carina-Near stellar moving group.[3][4][5]
In 2018, astronomers noted, "Detecting SIMP J01365663+0933473 with the VLA through its auroral radio emission, also means that we may have a new way of detecting exoplanets, including the elusive rogue ones not orbiting a parent star ... This particular object is exciting because studying its magnetic dynamo mechanisms can give us new insights on how the same type of mechanisms can operate in extrasolar planets - planets beyond our Solar System ... We think these mechanisms can work not only in brown dwarfs but also in both gas giant and terrestrial planets.

A rogue, planet-sized object 20 light-years away from Earth has stunned astronomers with its incredibly powerful magnetic field.
The scientists found that the object's magnetic field is more than 200 times stronger than Jupiter's, which, in turn, is between 16 and 54 times stronger than Earth's, according to NASA. How the object, which scientists call SIMP J01365663+0933473, can maintain a magnetic field so strong, as well as generate spectacular auroras, is still unclear.
"This particular object is exciting because studying its magnetic dynamo mechanisms can give us new insights on how the same type of mechanisms can operate in extrasolar planets — planets beyond our solar system," lead study author Melodie Kao, an astrophysicist at Arizona State University, said in a statement from the National Radio Astronomy Observatory published Aug. 2. [The Strangest Alien Planets We Know in Pictures]
And it's not just the magnetic mechanism that's leaving scientists with questions right now — there are plenty of other mysteries about the object, which scientists first discovered in 2016.
The object is what scientists call a brown dwarf. Nicknamed "failed stars," brown dwarfs are larger than planets, but not quite large enough to fuse hydrogen, the way stars do. The boundary line is still debated, but scientists tend to draw it at about 13 times the mass of Jupiter.
Originally, scientists thought SIMP J01365663+0933473 was a gigantic, old brown dwarf. But further study showed that it is instead relatively young, at 200 million years old, and is only 12.7 times the mass of Jupiter. That research also showed that the planet is on its own, not orbiting a star.
"This object is right at the boundary between a planet and a brown dwarf, or 'failed star,' and is giving us some surprises that can potentially help us understand magnetic processes on both stars and planets," Kao said in the statement. "We think these mechanisms can work not only in brown dwarfs but also in both gas giant and terrestrial planets."
The team is particularly excited by the new research because it relies in part on radio observations of the object's auroras — which means that radio telescopes may be able to identify new planets by their auroras.
The new research was described in an article published July 31 in the Astrophysical Journal.

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